Vegvisir/Helm of Awe altar cloth
Vegvisir/Helm of Awe altar cloth
Vegvisir/Helm of Awe altar cloth

Vegvisir/Helm of Awe altar cloth

Regular price $44.95

Altar cloths are used in sacred spaces to protect ritual working areas and for ceremonies. Keep your altar space protected with a handmade altar cloth, no altar space is complete without one.

Benefits of using altar cloths:

  • Protecting your ritual work space
  • Use to wrap ritual tools for outdoor use
  • Use for rune readings, divination and tarot readings
  • Collecting herbs within
  • Drape over trunks, night stands or for décor purposes
  • Tie twine around to use as a rune pouch

Dimensions: roughly 36 by 12 inches

Learn more about pagan ritual tools here:

https://oreamnosoddities.com/blogs/news/magical-tools-in-paganism

MADE IN THE USA

**The altar cloth pictured is the exact cloth you will receive after purchase**

**All altar cloths have designs hand burnt or painted within them**

**All animal hides and bones sold at Oreamnos Oddities are always ethically sourced.**

**A Vegvísir is an icelandic stave intended to help the bearer find their way through rough weather. The symbol is attested in the huld manuscript, collected in Iceland by Geir Vigfusson in 1880 (but consisting of material of earlier origin). A leaf of the manuscript provides an image of the vegvísir, gives its name, and, in prose, declares that "if this sign is carried, one will never lose one's way in storms or bad weather, even when the way is not known".**

**The Helm of Awe or Helm of Terror (Ægishjálmr) is an Icelandic magical stave. A physical object called "Helm of Terror" is referenced as one item Sigurd takes from the dragon Fafnir's hoard after he slays him in Völsunga saga.

An ancient Norse symbol that goes by a few names, the Helm of Awe, Aegishjalmur, Viking Compass, coming from the Viking era. The name Aegishjalmur is derived from the God of the ocean of Jotunheim, Aegir. Jotunheim is the land of the frost giants, one of the nine realms of Norse mythology. In the Poetic Edda, the Helm of Awe makes an appearance when the dragon Fafnir claims that he derives invincibility from bearing the symbol.


The Helm of Awe

I wore before the sons of men

In defense of my treasure;

Amongst all, I alone was strong,

I thought to myself,

For I found no power a match for my own.


In the Viking era, some would wear the symbol between their brows as a sign of strength in battle, believing, like the dragon Fafnir, that it would grant them victory in battle. The trident looking arms of the symbol are Z runes which symbolize protection and victory in battle. The Helm of Awe was also said to provide mental and spiritual protection as well as physical. The circle in the center is meant to symbolize the protection of those bearing the Helm of Awe.**