MD. Thurisaz/Death altar

This altar measures 13 x 7 inches and is made from a beautiful piece of pine.

This item is made to order. Please allow us 1 week to create your item and have it shipped to you.

All of my altars are 100% handmade from scratch.

It has a saw tooth hanger on the back so it can either be set on a table or hung from a wall.

On the face of the altar I have used a wood burning tool to engrave the wood with a human skull and a Thurs rune in a circle.

It is finished with a beautiful black ebony stain.

If you want a custom image burnt into an altar just shoot me a message!

In Norse mythology, Valhalla (from Old Norse Valhöll "hall of the slain"[1]) is a majestic, enormous hall located in Asgard, ruled over by the god Odin. Chosen by Odin, half of those who die in combat travel to Valhalla upon death, led by valkyries, while the other half go to the goddess Freyja's field Fólkvangr. In Valhalla, the dead join the masses of those who have died in combat known as Einherjar and various legendary Germanic heroes and kings, as they prepare to aid Odin during the events of Ragnarök. Before the hall stands the golden tree Glasir, and the hall's ceiling is thatched with golden shields. Various creatures live around Valhalla, such as the stag Eikþyrnir and the goat Heiðrún, both described as standing atop Valhalla and consuming the foliage of the tree Læraðr.

Valhalla is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, the Prose Edda (written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson), Heimskringla (also written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson) and in stanzas of an anonymous 10th century poem commemorating the death of Eric Bloodaxe known as Eiríksmál as compiled in Fagrskinna. Valhalla has inspired various works of art, publication titles, and elements of popular culture, and has become a term synonymous with a martial (or otherwise) hall of the chosen dead.

MD. Thurisaz/Death altar

$59.95
MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar
MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar MD. Thurisaz/Death altar

MD. Thurisaz/Death altar

$59.95
$59.95

This altar measures 13 x 7 inches and is made from a beautiful piece of pine.

This item is made to order. Please allow us 1 week to create your item and have it shipped to you.

All of my altars are 100% handmade from scratch.

It has a saw tooth hanger on the back so it can either be set on a table or hung from a wall.

On the face of the altar I have used a wood burning tool to engrave the wood with a human skull and a Thurs rune in a circle.

It is finished with a beautiful black ebony stain.

If you want a custom image burnt into an altar just shoot me a message!

In Norse mythology, Valhalla (from Old Norse Valhöll "hall of the slain"[1]) is a majestic, enormous hall located in Asgard, ruled over by the god Odin. Chosen by Odin, half of those who die in combat travel to Valhalla upon death, led by valkyries, while the other half go to the goddess Freyja's field Fólkvangr. In Valhalla, the dead join the masses of those who have died in combat known as Einherjar and various legendary Germanic heroes and kings, as they prepare to aid Odin during the events of Ragnarök. Before the hall stands the golden tree Glasir, and the hall's ceiling is thatched with golden shields. Various creatures live around Valhalla, such as the stag Eikþyrnir and the goat Heiðrún, both described as standing atop Valhalla and consuming the foliage of the tree Læraðr.

Valhalla is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, the Prose Edda (written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson), Heimskringla (also written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson) and in stanzas of an anonymous 10th century poem commemorating the death of Eric Bloodaxe known as Eiríksmál as compiled in Fagrskinna. Valhalla has inspired various works of art, publication titles, and elements of popular culture, and has become a term synonymous with a martial (or otherwise) hall of the chosen dead.