LG. Sleipnir altar

This is the largest style altar I have listed in this design.

This item is made to order. Please allow 1 week processing time for us to create and ship to you.

It measures 14 x 9 inches!

All of our altars are 100% MADE FROM SCRATCH! This is how we do all of our wood working so when purchasing any altar from my store you know it was built from the ground up.

This altar is made from a beautiful piece of pine, is stained black ebony and I have used a wood burning tool to engrave the wood with Odin riding Sleipnir.

On the back of this altar is a saw tooth hanger so it can either be used free standing or hung from a wall!

The edges of all of my altars are routed out to give them a more ornate look. If you are interested in having a custom design burnt into an altar feel free to contact me and to send a photo of what you'd like!

A bit about Sleipnir:

In Norse mythology, Sleipnir (Old Norse "slippy"[1] or "the slipper"[2]) is an eight-legged horse ridden by Odin. Sleipnir is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both sources, Sleipnir is Odin's steed, is the child of Loki and Svaðilfari, is described as the best of all horses, and is sometimes ridden to the location of Hel. The Prose Edda contains extended information regarding the circumstances of Sleipnir's birth, and details that he is grey in color.

Sleipnir is also mentioned in a riddle found in the 13th century legendary saga Hervarar saga ok Heiðreks, in the 13th-century legendary saga Völsunga saga as the ancestor of the horse Grani, and book I of Gesta Danorum, written in the 12th century by Saxo Grammaticus, contains an episode considered by many scholars to involve Sleipnir. Sleipnir is generally accepted as depicted on two 8th century Gotlandic image stones: the Tjängvide image stone and the Ardre VIII image stone.

Scholarly theories have been proposed regarding Sleipnir's potential connection to shamanic practices among the Norse pagans. In modern times, Sleipnir appears in Icelandic folklore as the creator of Ásbyrgi, in works of art, literature, software, and in the names of ships.

LG. Sleipnir altar

$79.95
LG. Sleipnir altar LG. Sleipnir altar LG. Sleipnir altar LG. Sleipnir altar
LG. Sleipnir altar LG. Sleipnir altar LG. Sleipnir altar LG. Sleipnir altar

LG. Sleipnir altar

$79.95
$79.95

This is the largest style altar I have listed in this design.

This item is made to order. Please allow 1 week processing time for us to create and ship to you.

It measures 14 x 9 inches!

All of our altars are 100% MADE FROM SCRATCH! This is how we do all of our wood working so when purchasing any altar from my store you know it was built from the ground up.

This altar is made from a beautiful piece of pine, is stained black ebony and I have used a wood burning tool to engrave the wood with Odin riding Sleipnir.

On the back of this altar is a saw tooth hanger so it can either be used free standing or hung from a wall!

The edges of all of my altars are routed out to give them a more ornate look. If you are interested in having a custom design burnt into an altar feel free to contact me and to send a photo of what you'd like!

A bit about Sleipnir:

In Norse mythology, Sleipnir (Old Norse "slippy"[1] or "the slipper"[2]) is an eight-legged horse ridden by Odin. Sleipnir is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both sources, Sleipnir is Odin's steed, is the child of Loki and Svaðilfari, is described as the best of all horses, and is sometimes ridden to the location of Hel. The Prose Edda contains extended information regarding the circumstances of Sleipnir's birth, and details that he is grey in color.

Sleipnir is also mentioned in a riddle found in the 13th century legendary saga Hervarar saga ok Heiðreks, in the 13th-century legendary saga Völsunga saga as the ancestor of the horse Grani, and book I of Gesta Danorum, written in the 12th century by Saxo Grammaticus, contains an episode considered by many scholars to involve Sleipnir. Sleipnir is generally accepted as depicted on two 8th century Gotlandic image stones: the Tjängvide image stone and the Ardre VIII image stone.

Scholarly theories have been proposed regarding Sleipnir's potential connection to shamanic practices among the Norse pagans. In modern times, Sleipnir appears in Icelandic folklore as the creator of Ásbyrgi, in works of art, literature, software, and in the names of ships.