Vegvisir altar cloth

This altar cloth is made from ethically sourced deer hide. See my photos for size reference.

All of my altar cloths are heavily distressed due to the tanning process.

I burn all of the designs into the hide by hand.

Photos don't give the burning justice and when viewed in person the burning looks like a bronze paint. All of the cloths are deep black.

This cloth is adorned with a vegvisir. Use this cloth for rune storage, to drape over your altar or for a carrying case to take your ritual tools with you outdoors.

 

A vegvísir (Icelandic 'sign post' or 'wayfinder' lit 'way wiser') is an Icelandic magical stave intended to help the bearer find their way through rough weather. The symbol is attested in the Huld Manuscript, collected in Iceland by Geir Vigfusson in 1880 (but consisting of material of earlier origin).[1]

A leaf of the manuscript provides an image of the vegvísir, gives its name, and, in prose, declares that "if this sign is carried, one will never lose one's way in storms or bad weather, even when the way is not known"

Vegvisir altar cloth

$39.95
Vegvisir altar cloth Vegvisir altar cloth Vegvisir altar cloth Vegvisir altar cloth
Vegvisir altar cloth Vegvisir altar cloth Vegvisir altar cloth Vegvisir altar cloth

Vegvisir altar cloth

$39.95
$39.95

This altar cloth is made from ethically sourced deer hide. See my photos for size reference.

All of my altar cloths are heavily distressed due to the tanning process.

I burn all of the designs into the hide by hand.

Photos don't give the burning justice and when viewed in person the burning looks like a bronze paint. All of the cloths are deep black.

This cloth is adorned with a vegvisir. Use this cloth for rune storage, to drape over your altar or for a carrying case to take your ritual tools with you outdoors.

 

A vegvísir (Icelandic 'sign post' or 'wayfinder' lit 'way wiser') is an Icelandic magical stave intended to help the bearer find their way through rough weather. The symbol is attested in the Huld Manuscript, collected in Iceland by Geir Vigfusson in 1880 (but consisting of material of earlier origin).[1]

A leaf of the manuscript provides an image of the vegvísir, gives its name, and, in prose, declares that "if this sign is carried, one will never lose one's way in storms or bad weather, even when the way is not known"