LG. Hati & Skoll altar

This item is made to order. Please allow us 1 week processing time to create this item before shipping.

This is the largest style altar I have listed in this design.

It measures 14 x 9 inches!

All of our altars are 100% MADE FROM SCRATCH! This is how we do all of our wood working so when purchasing any altar from my store you know it was built from the ground up.

This altar is made from a beautiful piece of pine, is stained black ebony and I have used a wood burning tool to engrave the wood with Hati and Skoll chasing the sun and the moon.

On the back of this altar is a saw tooth hanger so it can either be used free standing or hung from a wall!

The edges of all of my altars are routed out to give them a more ornate look. If you are interested in having a custom design burnt into an altar feel free to contact me and to send a photo of what you'd like!

A bit about Hati & Skoll:

Skoll (pronounced roughly “SKOHL”; Old Norse Sköll, “One Who Mocks”) and Hati (pronounced “HAHT-ee”; Old Norse Hati, “One Who Hates”) are two wolves who are only mentioned in passing references that have to do with their pursuing Sol and Mani, the sun and moon, through the sky in hopes of devouring them. At Ragnarok, the downfall of the cosmos, they catch their prey as the sky and earth darken and collapse.

It’s not entirely clear which one of them pursues the sun and which pursues the moon. The medieval Icelandic historian Snorri Sturluson, whose works are typically taken at face value in low-quality introductory books on Norse mythology, claims that Skoll chases the sun and Hati the moon.[1] However, Snorri’s source in this passage, the Eddic poem Grímnismál, says the following in the relevant stanza:

Skoll is the name of the wolf
Who follows the shining priest
Into the desolate forest,
And the other is Hati,
Hróðvitnir’s son,
Who chases the bright bride of the sky.[2]

The noun used for Skoll’s prey, goði (“priest”), is masculine, and the noun used for Hati’s prey, brúðr (“bride”) is feminine. Since Mani (the moon) is male, and Sol (the sun) is female, the wording of this stanza strongly suggests that Skoll hunts the moon and Hati the sun.

This same stanza names the father of Hati (and surely, by extension, Skoll as well) as Hróðvitnir. Since another poem in the Poetic Edda, the Lokasenna, uses the essentially identical word Hróðrsvitnir (“Famous Wolf”[3]) as a byname for Fenrir,[4], the arch-wolf, it would seem that Fenrir is their father. This interpretation finds additional support in another Eddic poem, the Völuspá, which states that the children of Fenrir swallow the sun during Ragnarok.[5]

Ultimately, however, proposing a definitive genealogical relationship between Fenrir, Skoll, and Hati is futile. The sources themselves give contradictory interpretations, which reflects the lack of systematization or codification in the Norse religion back when it was a living tradition. As with so many other aspects of Norse mythology and religion, any single, tidy interpretation we might try to foist upon the material today in the interest of resolving its many contradictions is a modern, artificial imposition.

LG. Hati & Skoll altar

$79.95
LG. Hati & Skoll altar LG. Hati & Skoll altar LG. Hati & Skoll altar LG. Hati & Skoll altar LG. Hati & Skoll altar
LG. Hati & Skoll altar LG. Hati & Skoll altar LG. Hati & Skoll altar LG. Hati & Skoll altar LG. Hati & Skoll altar

LG. Hati & Skoll altar

$79.95
$79.95

This item is made to order. Please allow us 1 week processing time to create this item before shipping.

This is the largest style altar I have listed in this design.

It measures 14 x 9 inches!

All of our altars are 100% MADE FROM SCRATCH! This is how we do all of our wood working so when purchasing any altar from my store you know it was built from the ground up.

This altar is made from a beautiful piece of pine, is stained black ebony and I have used a wood burning tool to engrave the wood with Hati and Skoll chasing the sun and the moon.

On the back of this altar is a saw tooth hanger so it can either be used free standing or hung from a wall!

The edges of all of my altars are routed out to give them a more ornate look. If you are interested in having a custom design burnt into an altar feel free to contact me and to send a photo of what you'd like!

A bit about Hati & Skoll:

Skoll (pronounced roughly “SKOHL”; Old Norse Sköll, “One Who Mocks”) and Hati (pronounced “HAHT-ee”; Old Norse Hati, “One Who Hates”) are two wolves who are only mentioned in passing references that have to do with their pursuing Sol and Mani, the sun and moon, through the sky in hopes of devouring them. At Ragnarok, the downfall of the cosmos, they catch their prey as the sky and earth darken and collapse.

It’s not entirely clear which one of them pursues the sun and which pursues the moon. The medieval Icelandic historian Snorri Sturluson, whose works are typically taken at face value in low-quality introductory books on Norse mythology, claims that Skoll chases the sun and Hati the moon.[1] However, Snorri’s source in this passage, the Eddic poem Grímnismál, says the following in the relevant stanza:

Skoll is the name of the wolf
Who follows the shining priest
Into the desolate forest,
And the other is Hati,
Hróðvitnir’s son,
Who chases the bright bride of the sky.[2]

The noun used for Skoll’s prey, goði (“priest”), is masculine, and the noun used for Hati’s prey, brúðr (“bride”) is feminine. Since Mani (the moon) is male, and Sol (the sun) is female, the wording of this stanza strongly suggests that Skoll hunts the moon and Hati the sun.

This same stanza names the father of Hati (and surely, by extension, Skoll as well) as Hróðvitnir. Since another poem in the Poetic Edda, the Lokasenna, uses the essentially identical word Hróðrsvitnir (“Famous Wolf”[3]) as a byname for Fenrir,[4], the arch-wolf, it would seem that Fenrir is their father. This interpretation finds additional support in another Eddic poem, the Völuspá, which states that the children of Fenrir swallow the sun during Ragnarok.[5]

Ultimately, however, proposing a definitive genealogical relationship between Fenrir, Skoll, and Hati is futile. The sources themselves give contradictory interpretations, which reflects the lack of systematization or codification in the Norse religion back when it was a living tradition. As with so many other aspects of Norse mythology and religion, any single, tidy interpretation we might try to foist upon the material today in the interest of resolving its many contradictions is a modern, artificial imposition.